100% Rye

100% Rye - Shannon Stronger

100% Rye – Shannon Stronger – Nourishing Days

I recently purchased Nourishing Days’ Shannon Stronger’s 100% Rye sourdough recipe e-book, and have been super thrilled with the results.  I’m using my wild-wrangled-yeast whole rye sourdough starter for the sourdough called for in the recipes, and it seems to work just fine (it’s roughly a 1:1 by volume ratio of flour:water).  I just made the brownies and they are divine – rich, brownie texture, not too sweet (i.e. it’s not the only flavour), but really great chocolate fix.  Our favourites:

Chewy Molasses Snack Bread
No-Knead Multipurpose Dough (more on that in a moment)
No-Knead Sourdough Pizza Crust

I’ve made the above recipes so many times, I’ve almost got them memorized.  I’ve adjusted the multipurpose dough to a “bucket” dough, and find that leaving it in the refrigerator overnight (at least) really improves the resulting bread.  Using Shannon’s No-Knead Sourdough Loaf recipe (but the bucket-ed sourdough) I add 3 tsp cinnamon, and I use a smidge of olive oil before measuring the molasses (I think it’s 5 tbsp molasses that I add), and 3 tsp sea salt (I’m pulling this from the back of my brain, might not be right! check her original recipe, similar to her boule recipe).

I take out about 3 cups of the “bucket” dough and reserve it to start my next bucket – adding no further starter, just following Shannon’s directions for the rest of the multipurpose dough recipe.  I’ve made three loaves from the leftover “bucket” dough: two regular sourdough loaves, plus a raisin loaf, to which I add raisins and more cinnamon and a bit of raw sugar (maybe 2 tbsp) after I’ve removed enough prepared dough for the two regular loaves first.

Recently, I used my Pullman loaf pan (inherited via my aunt’s family who used to run a deli business and baked their bread in that loaf pan every morning) to make up all of the dough in one big loaf (minus the 3 cups removed for starting the next “bucket”), and it was magnificent.  It took longer to bake, but I let it rise first, and baked it at the same temp as Shannon’s regular loaf recipe calls for.

I believe this has been a very successful $6 (roughly!) spent.

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sourdough vegan cupcakes

my sourdough version:
1/3 c sourdough starter
1/3 c mylk
1 c flour (1/2 sorghum, 1/4 teff, 1/4 arrowroot)
sour overnight

next morning, mix 1 cup cooked sweet potato
1 ripe banana
1/4 c olive oil
1/4 c honey
1 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp each cardamom & cloves
1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda

combine with soured ingredients
bake @ 350F until done (20 min or more)

result: pretty tasty, quite moist, nice little cupcake

Sourdough Delicata Loaf

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sourdough delicata loaf

we grew some delicata squash this year and they are super sweet, extremely starchy, and little.  perfect for baking with.  success as cupcakes, but also very successful using the sourdough muffin/loaf foundation recipe.  maple syrup for the sweetness plus a little bit of cane juice sugar and some pumpkin seeds for crunch sprinkled atop.

these delicatas are also beautiful braised in apple cider – see Andrea Chesman’s Recipes from the Root Cellar (reprinted here, but the original book is well worth the investment – I’ve many favourites that I go to in the winter from it)

LF Nettle Kraut

nettle kraut WIP via Gaia’s Gifts

shredded cabbage + chopped stinging nettle (gloves!) + salt + LF vessel = delicious

who knew?

and we’ve now got a fresh crop of stinging nettles off the plants I’d harvested in spring (again, who knew?), along with cabbages sitting awaiting harvest in the garden… another batch to make!

Steps to Health

Young boy tending freshly stocked fruit and vegetable stand at Center Market, 02/18/1915 – US National Archives credit (via Flickr The Commons)

while obviously not perfectly adhered to, here are our general guidelines

Pollan’s Food Rules (this is #1 – everything else falls into place after this):
eat (real) food. not much. mostly plants.

from Nourishing Traditions:
proper seed, grain, nut, legume preparation
eat the whole (pasture raised) animal (organs, fat, bones, muscle)
fermented foods
(ideally) biodynamic, organic, local produce*
whole (ideally raw) non-homogenized dairy

*but I take what I can get /afford; sometimes, at best, I’m happy to have whole, fresh produce

from Weston A. Price

high quality fish oil supplements

from Dr. Terry Wahls (much similar to Weston A. Price guidelines & NT)

9 cups fresh veggies & fruit a day (3 dark green, 3 sulfur, 3 colour)
include spices and herbs
Omega 3 rich foods, green leaves and animals fed green leaves (pasture raised & wild), wild fish and seafood
eat organ meats once per week
regular bone broth
fermented foods
sea vegetables once a week
eat local, preferably grow your own

Happy Rice

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soured brown rice

according to Nourishing Traditions, it’s important to soak your grains at minimum, and best to sour (ferment) them

here’s the crock devoted to grain souring (rice & old fashioned oatmeal each get soured, drained & dehydrated, then stored for use), with a batch of GMO free Lundberg Eco-Farmed short grain brown rice

GF Sourdough Starter

I have yet to try a gluten free sourdough starter.  rye is not gluten free, but gluten doesn’t seem to be the culprit wheat protein in this household.

keen to try with teff

here’s a recipe for brown rice